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​Work Zone Safety

Each year, Georgia DOT participates in the national Work Zone Awareness – weeklong – initiative. The goal of this awareness week is to remind the public, who travel the roadways, about the danger to workers in work zones.

      Notice

      Georgia DOT Implores Motorists to Pay Strict Attention in Work Zones

      Tuesday, May 10, 2016

      In less than a week, two work zone crashes have killed a driver, seriously injured a Georgia DOT worker and proved to be traumatic near misses for other employees.

      On Monday, May 9, Assistant Highway Maintenance Foreman Curtis Lewis was critically injured in a work zone on SR 113 in Polk County. Lewis and co-worker Michael Allan Hatch were outside their truck as they patched the road. A vehicle rear-ended the DOT truck causing the truck to strike Lewis, who was airlifted to Grady Hospital and is listed in stable condition.

      In a separate incident, on Friday, May 6 a motorist was killed, and Highway Emergency Response Operator (HERO) Operator 1 Miguel Jaime was uninjured in a work zone on I-285 at Old National Road in south Fulton County. While the HERO assisted a stranded motorist on the shoulder of the road, another vehicle entered the work zone and struck the back of the HERO truck. Jaime, who was not in his truck, was not hurt. Unfortunately, the driver of the vehicle that struck the HERO truck died in transit to the hospital.

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      Work Zone Facts

      58

      GDOT Worker who have died in work zones

      Georgia DOT workers died in work zones over the last four decades.

      31,251


      People Injured Each Year in Work Zone Crashes (2014)*

      669


      Work Zone Related Fatalities (2014)*

      82%


      Work Zone Fatalities are Drivers and Passengers, not Workers (2014)*​​​​



      Georgia DOT Employees Who Died in Work Zones

      First NameLast NameYear
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      Moses B.King2016
      Spencer D.Pass2011
      Troy J.Nix2008
      Tommy G.Hudson2005
      Priscilla A.Donald2004
      Danny C.Wilbanks2002
      Randy D.Reece2001
      Gerry D.Collins1999
      RobertGolway1998
      HarryDuncan1996
      DougCasey1996
      ThomasGassett1996
      NormanSlaton1996
      RonnieCarter1996
      SteveMoore1996
      DennisHouston1995
      RodSmith1994
      BuddyTeddar1993
      JimmyNorman1990
      GhettisMcGhee1990
      RickeyBrown1990
      OtisMoss1988
      FrankHeath1987
      WilliamGilreath1985
      EverettAndrews1984

      * National statistics from the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration, Fatality Analysis Reporting System (FARS), and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH).


       

      2016 National Work Zone Awareness Week

      Photo Gallery

      In recognition of National Work Zone Awareness Week, Georgia DOT held a memorial to highlight the importance of drivers practicing extra caution in work zones, paying attention, slowing down and driving responsibly. Georgia DOT Commissioner, Russell McMurry as well as other representatives from federal, state and media agencies spoke during the memorial.

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        Georgia DOT Worker Recalls Danger of Working on the Road

        Earlier this year, dashboard camera video from a sheriff deputy’s patrol car captured southwest Georgia DOT Assistant Area Maintenance Engineer Roger Minshew nearly getting hit by a semi on I-75. Minshew was called out at 1 a.m. January 24, 2016 to detour traffic in Cordele due to a double fatality crash north of Crisp County. Minshew parked his state truck with strobe lights activated near the shoulder while a sheriff’s deputy angled his car, with blue lights running, in the middle lane.

        “You could see the headlights coming from two miles down the road. A truck switched from the middle to the fast lane and didn’t change his speed much. We hit him with the flashlights trying to slow him down or stop him,” Minshew said.

        Minshew and the deputy took off running as the semi closed in and hit the patrol car. The car’s video recorded Minshew dashing past his own truck to the shoulder of the interstate.

         

        10 Tips for Driving in Work Zones


        Expect the Unexpected

        Things may change overnight. Normal speed limits may be reduced, traffic lanes may be closed, narrowed, or shifted, and people may be working on or near the road.

        Don’t Speed

        ​Obey the posted speed limit, even when workers are not present. Speeding was involved in more than one-third (36%) of the fatal crashes that occurred in construction/ maintenance zones in 2011.

        Don’t Tailgate

        ​Keep a safe distance between you and the car ahead of you and the construction workers and their equipment. Rear-end collisions account for 30% of work zone crashes.

        Obey Road Crew Flaggers & Pay Attention to Signs

        Failure to obey speed limit signs or a flagger’s traffic control directions can result in hefty fines and/or imprisonment.

        Stay Alert & Minimize Distractions

        Give your full attention to the roadway and avoid changing radio stations or using cell phones and other electronic devices while approaching and driving in a work zone.

        Keep Up with the Traffic Flow

        ​Do not slow down to gawk at road work.

        Know Before You Go

        Expect delays, leave early and schedule enough time to drive safely. For 24/7 real-time traffic information call 511 or visit www.511ga.org (do not do this when driving!). And follow Georgia DOT on Twitter for additional updates.

        Be Patient and Stay Calm

        Work zone crews are working to improve the road and make your future drive better.

        Wear Your Seatbelt

        It is your best defense in a crash. And make sure your passengers are buckled up.


        Remember: Dads, Moms, Sons, Daughters, Brothers, and Sisters Work HERE!

         

        2015 Work Zone Awareness Event Photos

        Georgia DOT Commissioner Russell McMurry, along with key federal and state partners, memorialized 57 Georgia DOT employees who died in work zone incidents throughout the state since 1973. The event took place in an active work zone on the Northwest Corridor along I-75. View Press Release


        10 Tips for Driving in Work Zones


        Expect the Unexpected

        Things may change overnight. Normal speed limits may be reduced, traffic lanes may be closed, narrowed, or shifted, and people may be working on or near the road.

        Don’t Speed

        ​Obey the posted speed limit, even when workers are not present. Speeding was involved in more than one-third (36%) of the fatal crashes that occurred in construction/ maintenance zones in 2011.

        Don’t Tailgate

        ​Keep a safe distance between you and the car ahead of you and the construction workers and their equipment. Rear-end collisions account for 30% of work zone crashes.

        Obey Road Crew Flaggers & Pay Attention to Signs

        Failure to obey speed limit signs or a flagger’s traffic control directions can result in hefty fines and/or imprisonment.

        Stay Alert & Minimize Distractions

        Give your full attention to the roadway and avoid changing radio stations or using cell phones and other electronic devices while approaching and driving in a work zone.

        Keep Up with the Traffic Flow

        ​Do not slow down to gawk at road work.

        Know Before You Go

        Expect delays, leave early and schedule enough time to drive safely. For 24/7 real-time traffic information call 511 or visit www.511ga.org (do not do this when driving!). And follow Georgia DOT on Twitter for additional updates.

        Be Patient and Stay Calm

        Work zone crews are working to improve the road and make your future drive better.

        Wear Your Seatbelt

        It is your best defense in a crash. And make sure your passengers are buckled up.


        Remember: Dads, Moms, Sons, Daughters, Brothers, and Sisters Work HERE!

        Georgia's Move-Over Law

        The law requires drivers - when encountering a stationary emergency vehicle flashing emergency lights - to changes lanes or slow down and be prepared to stop. This applies to Georgia DOT work zones, as well as law enforcement, first responders, tow operators and HERO operators. The Move-Over fine in Georgia is up to $500.

        View Move-Over-Law

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        Distracting Driving Videos

        Watch Georgia DOT's educational videos about the impact of distracting driving. This video series was released in support of the Federal Highway Administration's Toward Zero Deaths initiative to reduce fatalities on the roadways

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